White Fang Audiobook free characters

 

 

 

  • White Fang characters 
  • White Fang is the book's main character. He is three-quarters wolf and one-quarter dog. He is born wild but becomes more dog-like after Grey Beaver domesticates him. He grows up fierce and unloved, constantly bullied by other dogs, and becomes a fighting dog after Beauty Smith buys him. He eventually becomes more loving and friendly after he is bought and tamed by Weedon Scott. He saves Judge Scott’s life by killing Jim Hall and eventually has six pups with Collie.
  • Weedon Scott is White Fang's third master and the first to show affection towards him. He saves White Fang from the bulldog and forcefully buys him from Beauty Smith. He tries to tame White Fang and slowly gains his trust, then finally his love. He takes White Fang to live with him in California.
  • Grey Beaver is White Fang's first master. He is harsh and shows no affection for his dog, but White Fang still displays loyalty toward him out of respect for his superiority. Grey Beaver only sells White Fang after becoming addicted to alcohol.
  • Kiche is White Fang's mother; she is known as the "she-wolf" at the beginning of the novel. She is half wolf, half dog and used to be Grey Beaver’s brother’s dog, but escaped during a famine. When she returns to the Native Americans, she gets sent away from White Fang and only sees him once more in the novel, where she chases him off to protect her new pups.
  • Lip-lip is a canine pup who also lives in the Native American village. He brutally bullies White Fang throughout his puppyhood and turns all the other dogs against him. White Fang kills him after he flees into the woods during a famine.
  • Beauty Smith is White Fang's second master. He is an ugly man who gets Grey Beaver addicted to alcohol so that he can buy White Fang. He trains White Fang to become a fighting dog. He tries to steal White Fang back after Scott forcefully buys him, but White Fang brutally attacks him.
  • One Eye is White Fang's father. He is full wolf and kills his rivals to mate with Kiche. He is killed by a lynx when he tries to rob its den for food during a famine.
  • Jim Hall is a criminal who escapes from prison after Judge Scott unjustly sentences him. He attempts to murder Judge Scott, but White Fang attacks and kills him.
  • Judge Scott is Weedon Scott's father. He does not trust White Fang completely until he saves his life from Jim Hall.
  • Collie is a sheepdog on Scott’s farm. She does not trust White Fang at first, but he works his way into her confidence, and they become mates.
  • Henry is a musher who appears in the first part of the novel with Bill. He is the only one who escapes being eaten by the wolves.
  • Bill is a musher who appears in the first part of the novel with Henry. The wolves eat him when he attempts to go after the pack with a gun.
  • Mit-sah is Grey Beaver's son. He runs White Fang and the other dogs on a sled.
  • Matt is Scott's musher. He feeds White Fang and works him on the sled during the day.

 

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Sherlock Holmes quotes A Study in Scarlet audio book

A Study in Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Audiobook free audiobook

 

A Study in Scarlet quotes 

 

  • I had neither kith nor kin in England, and was therefore as free as air — or as free as an income of eleven shillings and sixpence a day will permit a man to be. Under such circumstances I naturally gravitated to London, that great cesspool into which all the loungers and idlers of the Empire are irresistibly drained. There I stayed for some time at a private hotel in the Strand, leading a comfortless, meaningless existence, and spending such money as I had, considerably more freely than I ought
    • Dr. Watson, in Part 1, chap. 1, p. 15
  • His ignorance was as remarkable as his knowledge. Of contemporary literature, philosophy and politics he appeared to know nothing. Upon my quoting Thomas Carlyle, he inquired in the naivest way who he might be and what he had done. My surprise reached a climax, however, when I found incidentally that he was ignorant of the Copernican Theory and of the composition of the Solar System. That any civilized being in this nineteenth century should not be aware that the earth traveled round the sun appeared to me to be such an extraordinary fact that I could hardly realize it.
    • Part 1, chap. 2
  • I consider that a man's brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things, so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it. Now the skillful workman is very careful indeed as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work, but of these he has a large assortment, and all in the most perfect order. It is a mistake to think that this little room has elastic walls and can distend to any extent. Depend upon it, there comes a time when for any addition of knowledge, you forget something that you knew before. It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts elbowing out the useful ones.
    • Part 1, chap. 2
  • Before turning to those moral and mental aspects of the matter which present the greatest difficulties, let the inquirer begin by mastering more elementary problems.
    • Part 1, chap. 2, p. 23
  • The theories which I have expressed there, and which appear to you to be so chimerical, are really extremely practical — so practical that I depend upon them for my bread and cheese.
    • Part 1, chap. 2, pp. 23-24
  • It was easier to know it than to explain why I know it. If you were asked to prove that two and two made four, you might find some difficulty, and yet you are quite sure of the fact.
    • Part 1, chap. 3, p. 26
  • It is a capital mistake to theorize before you have all the evidence. It biases the judgment.
    • Part 1, chap. 3, p. 27
    • See also The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, "A Scandal in Bohemia", below.
  • "They say that genius is an infinite capacity for taking pains," he remarked with a smile. "It's a very bad definition, but it does apply to detective work."
    • Part 1, chap. 3, p. 31
  • You know a conjurer gets no credit when once he has explained his trick; and if I show you too much of my method of working, you will come to the conclusion that I am a very ordinary individual after all.
    • Part 1, chap. 4, p. 33
  • When a fact appears to be opposed to a long train of deductions, it invariably proves to be capable of bearing some other interpretation.
    • Part. 1, chap. 7
  • "What you do in this world is a matter of no consequence," returned my companion, bitterly. "The question is, what can you make people believe that you have done?"
    • Part 2, chap. 7, p. 83
  • In solving a problem of this sort, the grand thing is to be able to reason backward. That is a very useful accomplishment, and a very easy one, but people do not practise it much. In the everyday affairs of life it is more useful to reason forward, and so the other comes to be neglected. There are fifty who can reason synthetically for one who can reason analytically.
    • Part 2, chap. 7, p. 83
  • There is no branch of detective science which is so important and so much neglected as the art of tracing footsteps.
    • Part 2, chap. 7, p. 84
  • I had no idea that such individuals exist outside of stories.
    • Dr. Watson about Holmes
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Anna Karenina Audiobook Book 1 Chapter 1 quotes free

 

 

 

 

Anna Karenina quotes

  • Vengeance is mine; I will repay.
    • Epigraph
  • All happy families resemble one another, each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.
    • Pt. I, ch. 1
    • Variant translations: Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.
      All happy families resemble one another; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.
  • There was no answer, except the general answer life gives to all the most complex and insoluble questions. That answer is: one must live for the needs of the day, in other words, become oblivious. To become oblivious in dreams was impossible now, at least till night-time; it was impossible to return to that music sung by carafe-women; and so one had to become oblivious in the dreams of life.
    • Pt. 1, ch. 2
  • He knew she was there by the joy and fear that overwhelmed his heart.
    • Pt. I, ch. 9
  • He stepped down, trying not to look long at her, as if she were the sun, yet he saw her, like the sun, even without looking.
    • Pt. I, ch. 9
  • All his life Alexey Alexandrovitch had lived and worked in official spheres, having to do with the reflection of life. And every time he had stumbled against life itself he had shrunk away from it. Now he experienced a feeling akin to that of a man who, wile calmly crossing a precipice by a bridge, should suddenly discover that the bridge is broken, and that there is a chasm below. That chasm was life itself, the bridge that artificial life in which Alexey Alexandrovitch had lived.
    • Part II, Chapter 8
  • Vronsky, meanwhile, in spite of the complete realization of what he had so long desired, was not perfectly happy. He soon felt that the realization of his desires gave him no more than a grain of sand out of the mountain of happiness he had expected. It showed him the mistake men make in picturing to themselves happiness as the realization of their desires. For a time after joining his life to hers, and putting on civilian dress, he had felt all the delight of freedom in general, of which he had known nothing before, and of freedom in his love — and he was content, but not for long. He was soon aware that there was springing up in his heart a desire for desires — longing. Without conscious intention he began to clutch at every passing caprice, taking it for a desire and an object.
  • There was something in her higher than what surrounded her. There was in her the glow of the real diamond among glass imitations. This glow shone out in her exquisite, truly enigmatic eyes. The weary, and at the same time passionate, glance of those eyes, encircled by dark rings, impressed one by its perfect sincerity. Everyone looking into those eyes fancied he knew her wholly, and knowing her, could not but love her.
    • Anna’s thoughts about Liza, Part III, Chapter 13
  • “If you want him defined, here he is: a prime, well-fed beast such as takes medals at the cattle shows, and nothing more,” he said, with a tone of vexation that interested her.
    “No; how so?” she replied. “He's seen a great deal, anyway; he's cultured?”
    “It's an utterly different culture—their culture. He's cultivated, one sees, simply to be able to despise culture, as they despise everything but animal pleasures.”
    • Vronky and Anna discussing the visiting Prince, Part 4, Chapter 3
  • One can insult an honest man or an honest woman, but to tell a thief that he is a thief is merely la constation d'un fait [The establishing of a fact.]
    • Pt. IV, ch. 4
  • The new commission for the inquiry into the condition of the native tribes in all its branches had been formed and dispatched to its destination with an unusual speed and energy inspired by Alexey Alexandrovitch. Within three months a report was presented. The condition of the native tribes was investigated in its political, administrative, economic, ethnographic, material, and religious aspects. To all these questions there were answers admirably stated, and answers admitting no shade of doubt, since they were not a product of human thought, always liable to error, but were all the product of official activity. The answers were all based on official data furnished by governors and heads of churches, and founded on the reports of district magistrates and ecclesiastical superintendents, founded in their turn on the reports of parochial overseers and parish priests; and so all of these answers were unhesitating and certain. All such questions as, for instance, of the cause of failure of crops, of the adherence of certain tribes to their ancient beliefs, etc.—questions which, but for the convenient intervention of the official machine, are not, and cannot be solved for ages—received full, unhesitating solution.
    • Part IV, Chapter 6
  • "Respect was invented to cover the empty place where love should be."
    • (voice of Anna) C. Garnett, trans. (New York: 2003), Part 7, Chapter 24 p. 685
  • Reason has discovered the struggle for existence and the law that I must throttle all those who hinder the satisfaction of my desires. That is the deduction reason makes. But the law of loving others could not be discovered by reason, because it is unreasonable.
    • Pt. VIII, ch. 13
  • There is one evident, indubitable manifestation of the Divinity, and that is the laws of right which are made known to the world through Revelation.
    • Pt. VIII, ch. 19
  • My reason will still not understand why I pray, but I shall still pray, and my life, my whole life, independently of anything that may happen to me, is every moment of it no longer meaningless as it was before, but has an unquestionable meaning of goodness with which I have the power to invest it.'
    • Pt. VIII, ch. 19

 

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Robinson Crusoe Audiobook free qoutes

 

 

  • He bade me observe it, and I should always find that the calamities of life were shared among the upper and lower part of mankind; but that the middle station had the fewest disasters.
    • Ch. 1, Start in Life.
  • I have since often observed, how incongruous and irrational the common temper of mankind is, especially of youth, to that reason which ought to guide them in such cases - viz. they are not ashamed to sin, and yet are ashamed to repent. Not ashamed of the action for which they ought justly to be esteemed fools, but are ashamed of the returning, which can only make them be esteemed wise men.
    • Ch. 1, Start in Life.
  • One day, about noon, going towards my boat, I was exceedingly surprised with the print of a man's naked foot on the shore, which was very plain to be seen on the sand.
    • Ch. 11, Finds Print of Man's Foot on the Sand.
  • My man Friday.
    • First appears in Ch. 14, A Dream Realized.

 

  • Robinson Crusoe quotes

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Tom Sawyer Chapter 1 and 2 Audiobook

  • Tom Sawyer Quotes
  • Tom appeared on the sidewalk with a bucket of whitewash and a long-handled brush. He surveyed the fence, and all gladness left him and a deep melancholy settled down upon his spirit. Thirty yards of board fence nine feet high. Life to him seemed hollow, and existence but a burden.
    • Ch. 2.
  • He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it — namely, that in order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to obtain.
    • Ch. 2.
  • Work consists of whatever a body is OBLIGED to do, and...Play consists of whatever a body is not obliged to do.
    • Ch. 2.
  • The minister gave out his text and droned along monotonously through an argument that was so prosy that many a head by and by began to nod — and yet it was an argument that dealt in limitless fire and brimstone and thinned the predestined elect down to a company so small as to be hardly worth the saving.
    • Ch. 5.
  • There was no getting around the stubborn fact that taking sweetmeats was only "hooking," while taking bacon and hams and such valuables was plain simple stealing — and there was a command against that in the Bible. So they inwardly resolved that so long as they remained in the business, their piracies should not again be sullied with the crime of stealing.
    • Ch. 13.
  • To promise not to do a thing is the surest way in the world to make a body want to go and do that very thing.
    • Ch. 22.
  • She makes me get up just at the same time every morning; she makes me wash, they comb me all to thunder; she won't let me sleep in the woodshed; I got to wear them blamed clothes that just smothers me, Tom; they don't seem to let any air git through 'em, somehow; and they're so rotten nice that I can't set down, nor lay down, nor roll around anywher's; I hain't slid on a cellar-door for — well, it 'pears to be years; I got to go to church and sweat and sweat — I hate them ornery sermons! I can't ketch a fly in there, I can't chaw. I got to wear shoes all Sunday. The widder eats by a bell; she goes to bed by a bell; she gits up by a bell — everything's so awful reg'lar a body can't stand it.
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